Tuesday, November 30, 2010

Reduction of Non-CO2 Emissions at COP16

Although a binding treaty on carbon dioxide (CO2) is unlikely at COP16, reductions in non-CO2 emissions are viable. Using Current technology we can reduce agents that cause global warming by approximately 50 percent. According to scientists, reducing the non-CO2 pollutants can delay additional climate warming by several decades. Among the non-CO2 pollutants are hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), methane, tropospheric ozone, and black carbon soot.

Reductions in black carbon soot emissions could save many of 1.9 million lives lost each year. Capturing methane emissions from sources such as landfills and coal mines would also reduce global warming and the gas could be used as a source of energy.

It is also possible to quickly phase down HFCs under the Montreal Protocol ozone treaty. The US, Canada, and Mexico have already provided their support for this strategy. At a November meeting in Bangkok, 91 countries signed onto a declaration supporting the use of low-global warming potential substitutes instead of HFCs. This could reduce up to 100 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide-equivalent in mitigation.


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World Mayors Summit on Climate

Urban Leaders will present a pact at the Cancun climate talks now underway in Mexico. Mayors from around the world have signed what is known as the Mexico City Mayors Pact which commits them to reduce urban greenhouse gas emissions.

Cities have a tremendous capacity to address climate change. More than half of the world's population now lives in urban areas, they consume 80 percent of global energy and emit 60 percent of greenhouse gases.

This pact includes the signatures of 138 mayors from some of the world's largest urban areas including Buenos Aires, Johannesburg, Los Angeles, Paris, Vancouver and Jakarta. Five cities have already begun providing sample reports of some key actions, commitments and performances.

In a statement, Marcelo Ebrard, Mayor of Mexico City and chair of the World Mayors Council on Climate Change said, "mayors and urban leaders are on the frontline of the planet's fight against a changing climate."

While this may not be a binding agreement, it is a public promise that will be considered by voters at the ballot box. The pact requires participants to post their commitments and performance online, where city residents can look at it.

The monitoring and verification mechanism is called the "carbonn Cities Climate Registry" (cCCR) which will be operated by Germany's Bonn Center for Local Climate Action and Reporting.

Speaking at the Mexico City summit, Christiana Figueres, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC), welcomed the new cCCR mechanism saying it would "help local governments to demonstrate leadership in climate action." She added that subjecting cities to open and independent reviews is a "critical step for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of emission reductions over long-term lines."

Martha Delgado, Mexico City's secretary for the environment said, "Everyone is very excited to participate in this summit because they think that they are going to show national governments that it is possible to have commitments."

Mayors from all over the world are demonstrating leadership through their commitments to lowering emissions. Although most agree that we will not see a binding agreement at COP16, individual cities are taking it upon themselves to lead to way out of climate chaos.


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Monday, November 29, 2010

Yvo de Boer on the Future of the UNFCCC

At the World Energy Congress in Montreal, Canada, Rebecca Lutzy, interviewed the former UN climate change boss Yvo de Boer, on the future of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

The 16th session of the Conference of the Parties (COP16) to the UNFCCC and the sixth session of the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (COP/MOP) is being held in Cancun (Quintana Roo), Mexico, between 29 November and 10 December 2010.

After four years of hard work, de Boer left the UNFCCC earlier this year to work with KPMG. When asked about the future of the UNFCCC process and what to expect in Cancun, de Boer was optimistic, saying that he believes that "it should be possible to make practical progress on frameworks on adaptation, mitigation, technology, finance, capacity building, and forests."

de Boer explained that managing climate change is about a lot more than just reducing emissions. "If coming to grips with climate change were only about reducing emissions, then it would make a lot of sense to just bring the 20 or so major economies of the world together in a room and get them to focus on emissions reduction, but...the climate change agenda isn't only about reducing emissions. It's about adapting to the impacts of climate change as well...and then you're talking about the 100 or so developing countries who did absolutely nothing to contribute to climate change but will be confronted with the bulk of the impacts. So...you need a larger group at the table."

However, at the World Energy Congress roundtable, de Boer noted that more productive progress can be made by splitting up issues and having subsets of countries work on specifics, rather than having all countries "at the table" for all discussions.

de Boer also said that companies first need to figure out where they stand on carbon and other sustainability measures and then to respond to the risks and opportunities presented by their footprints.

He stressed that "it's clear that the international community wants to address climate change...it's clear that sustainability is rising to the top of the agenda of governments and companies and of consumers...the environment in which businesses have to operate is changing very rapidly." He used airlines, companies with long supply chains, and beer breweries as examples of businesses that face risks related to their carbon (and water) footprints but also face business opportunities through smart choices in responding to and reducing impacts.


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Global Cooperation Ahead of COP 15
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Sunday, November 28, 2010

Cyber Monday 2010

Green Gift Monday

In 2010, Cyber Monday takes place on November 29, and it is the biggest online shopping day of the year. On this day buyers are shopping online to take advantage of the deals offered on the web. This year a record breaking one billion dollars was spent online.

Online shopping is generally a greener way to shop, this is due to the fact that trucks can deliver goods efficiently and it takes a lot less energy to run a warehouse for boxes of goods than a mall.

According to a 2007 survey done by Conservation International, more than one-third of consumers indicated they will shop more online and in catalogs to save on gas.

The National Retail Federation (NRF) said that 70.1 million people plan to take advantage of 2010 Cyber Monday deals. The NRF also estimated that 88% of retailers will have special deals. Web retailers offer big discounts, free gift cards, and free shipping in order to entice buyers.

Even prior to Cyber Monday, online shopping was on the increase. On Thanksgiving Day, Paypal showed a 25% increase in 2010 over 2009, and this may be an indication of increases for 2010 Cyber Monday sales.

In the UK, online retailers are bullish about the run up to Christmas with sales estimated to rise to £6.4bn in December, according to IMRG, the e-commerce trade association. Last December, consumers spent £5.5bn online – itself a 17 per cent rise on the year before. The IMRG Capgemini e-Retail Sales Index for October revealed the highest October growth since pre-recession levels.

Chris Webster, head of retail consulting and technology at Capgemini said: “The market continues to grow ahead of our expectations and this is a crucial time for e-retailers to beat the competition by using innovative strategies and tactical promotions in the run up to Christmas. The web is consistently seen as the place to go for bargains and retailers with an online presence should use this to their advantage.”

Bjorn Kvarby, European Managing director of Shopping.com, said: “2010 is proving to be an incredible year for online shopping, as consumers begin to realize just how easy, time-efficient, and cost effective it is to find what they are looking for online.

"We’re already predicting overall growth for Shopping.com at 23 per cent for December 2010, year-on-year, and believe it’s going to be a bumper Christmas for the online retail market.”

To shop for products made by companies that manufacture greener products, seeThe Nature Conservancy's Green Gift Monday site, which is part of a campaign to turn Cyber Monday in a sustainable direction.


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Saturday, November 27, 2010

Social Capitalism



Social capitalism is a new market-based economic system. It addresses the problems inherent in both capitalism and socialism. Traditional capitalism often overlooks human and environmental interests and the central planning of traditional socialism impedes a rational allocation of resources.

In social capitalism, governments create greater profit opportunities for entrepreneurs by investing in desirable future industry and technologies (like rewable energy).

The essence of social capitalism is that markets work best and output is maximized through sound social management of the macroeconomy. Social capitalism posits that government regulation, and sponsorship of markets, can lead to superior economic outcomes.

Government investment in the green economy or securities regulation are examples of social capitalism. Regulation should be as limited as possible, however, regulation is needed to ensure that individuals and corporations do not exploit markets for personal gain at the expense of market growth, economic stability and environmental sustainability.

For business, social capitalism is the ability to create positive, healthy development. Businesses practicing social capitalism give back to society while creating an environment that is conducive to profit maximization.

Social capitalism is not hostile to free markets or the private ownership of property. Instead, social capitalism recognizes the unique success of capitalism, particularly under appropriate social supervision. Social capitalism thus seeks to create a balanced approach to business and the role of the state, with a view to optimizing the business environment for maximum sustainable economic growth.

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Friday, November 26, 2010

Green Shopping on Black Friday

American consumers love a good deal but that should also include a good deal for the environment. Although the environmental impact of all the Black Friday shopping is huge, there are many things that can be done to radically reduce this footprint while supporting greener offerings.

The Friday after Thanksgiving, has come to be known as Black Friday, a day that heralds the official beginning of the Christmas shopping season. However, it is also the start of the most environmentally destructive shopping period of the year.

Some may opt to make gifts, others may opt to avoid shopping altogether, but if you are going to shop, it is possible to make more environmentally aware choices. It is better to buy durable high quality, well-made items that are made using sustainably sourced materials and have very little or no packaging. Supporting companies that either make or sell eco-products and employ sustainable business practices is also a good way of advancing the green economy.

For the last few years, we have witnessed a positive trend in green shopping practices. According to a 2007 survey done by Conservation International, two out of five people would rather receive a "green" gift than a traditional one. Out of the 1,000 consumers surveyed by the group, women were more interested in going green, with 62% preferring to give and receive environmentally friendly goods. Seventeen percent of consumers surveyed say they will shop at retailers they perceive as greener. The same study also found that 44 percent of consumers are willing to pay extra for green gifts–between 10 and 25 percent more.

According to this study, 38 percent of consumers say they will use fewer plastic bags while 21 percent are planning on not wrapping holiday gifts to conserve paper. More than one-third of consumers saying they will shop more online and in catalogs this year in order to save on gas.

Another 2007 study indicated that nearly one in five consumers (18%) were planning to purchase more eco-friendly products this holiday season than in the past, and a similar number (17%) are willing to pay more for green gifts, according to Deloitte's annual survey of holiday spending and retail trends. About one-third of survey respondents also say they will use fewer plastic bags, and one in five will consider not wrapping holiday gifts to conserve paper.

These responses were consistent across gender, age, and income groups, indicating that environmental concerns have become more mainstream among consumers.

To be a more ecologically responsible shopper, look for products that are vetted by a reputable third-party government or non-profit certification program. When buying electronics make sure they have the Energy Star label, try to buy Organic, Fair Trade and Conflict Free products. When buying wood products or books look for the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) label.

According to Greenbiz, "a number of groups, ranging from the federal government to nonprofits to research groups, are jumping on the Black Friday bandwagon telling shoppers in effect, if you have to shop, shop for green goods."

For comparative assessments of products see Climate Counts' ratings. The "Striding Shopper campaign" (also taking place on Facebook) highlights some of the greenest companies in their fields (see chart).

Consumers and businesses are increasingly seeing the wisdom of a more sustainable approach to commerce. By factoring environmental issues into their buying decison, many consumers are making a difference. The business community are responding to this burgeoning trend.

Traditional capitalism created a high standard of living for some, but a new economic philosophy is emerging. Some have called this social capitalism, and it is helping to reduce humankind's destructive impact on the earth.


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Thursday, November 25, 2010

Thanksgiving: Learning to Live in Harmony with the Environment

Thanksgiving is the perfect time to deepen commitments to greener living and more sustainable business practices. Thanksgiving is all about being grateful for everything we have, and it is only natural that we should show our appreciation for the environment by learning to be better stewards of the earth.

Thanksgiving traces its origin from a 1621 Pilgrim harvest feast to celebrate a successful growing season and survival after an extremely difficult first winter in the New World. At that harvest feast these Pilgrims from England ate with the Wampanoag Indians in a spirit of friendship and camaraderie. The Pilgrims owed their survival to the goodwill of the Indians, who had taught them how to survive by living in harmony with the land. It is time to revive that long forgotten lesson and address the daunting environmental challenges we face today.

Here are some simple tips that can minimize our impact on the earth. Thanksgiving dinner is a big part of this holiday ritual, so food is a good place to start. Studies show that most groceries travel about 1,500 miles from the farm to store shelves. The same distance covered by a car that gets about 30 miles per gallon, pumps out about 1,200 pounds of CO2. Most commodities arrive in bulk on the back of a flatbed, so the impact may be even greater. Using local produce can help to reduce the footprint of the food we consume and patronizing establishments that have engaged sustainable practices can help to grow a greener economy.

Avoid toxic cleaning agents are harmful to the environment. Use natural cleaning products like baking soda and vinegar. Your dishwasher uses about half the energy, 1/6 of the water, and less soap than you might use during hand dishwashing. Air-dry the dishes rather than heat drying them. Use an eco-friendly detergent or make your own non-toxic dishwasher soap by mixing equal parts of borax and washing soda.Avoid cleaning agents with phosphates that nourish algae which use up oxygen in waterways. Use liquid soap, add 2 or 3 tablespoons of vinegar to warm, soapy water. Mix 1/2 cup vinegar and 1/4 cup baking soda (or 2 teaspoons borax) into 1/2 gallon (2 liters) water. Use microfiber cloths can clean without chemicals.

To clean carpet stains, mix equal parts white vinegar and water in a spray bottle. Spray directly on stain, let sit for several minutes, then clean with a brush or sponge using warm soapy water. For fresh grease spots, sprinkle corn starch onto spot and wait 15 - 30 minutes before vacuuming. For a heavy duty carpet cleaner, mix 1/4 cup each of salt, borax, and vinegar. Rub paste into carpet and leave for a few hours, then vacuum.

Rather than using toxic chemicals like bleach to disinfect surfaces, use a natural cleaner like lemon. For tougher stains, squeeze some of the lemon juice onto the spot and let sit for 10 minutes, then wipe. Stains in cups can be removed by applying vinegar to a sponge and wiping. To clean a tea kettle or coffee maker, add 2 cups water and 1/4 cup vinegar, bring to a boil, cool, and wipe with a clean cloth. Rinse thoroughly with warm water. Reusable containers should be used in place of plastic wraps, (they contain PVC which ends up in landfills).

The threat from climate change is real, however, so are the opportunities to address it. This Thanksgiving, we should all be doing our part and give thanks to the people and businesses that show their support for the environment and act to make this world a greener place.

Happy Thanksgiving and a heartfelt thank you to those who support the transition to a greener economy.

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

25 Blogs Leading the Sustainable Building Revolution

Green building is proliferating around the world, homes schools, hospitals, as well as government and commercial buildings are increasingly incorporating sustainable design. According to Environmental Science Degrees, here are 25 leading blogs that specialize in sustainable building.

1. Green Home Building and Sustainable Architecture: The author of this blog is well-versed in sustainable design, having previously resided in an earthbag and papercrete home that he designed.
2. Inhabitat: Newly and uniquely designed green buildings from throughout the world are displayed, including the beautiful Nissam Villas in Singapore.
3. Greenversations: Green Building Category: Employees of the EPA blog about their experiences and provide advice related to green building.
4. Eco-Business.com: Fittingly, an eco-business site supports sustainable building, providing information about measures being taken to make communities throughout the world greener.
5. Sustainable Industries Blog: The founder of Organic Architect offers his knowledge pertaining to everything from design considerations to efficiency improvements.
6. Green Building Elements: This blog specializes in the “construction of green buildings, ideas and the design behind them.”
7. Campus Green Builder: College students document the efforts of colleges and universities and their students to create eco-friendly campuses.
8. Sustainablog: Green building is one of the many aspects of sustainability covered on Sustainablog.
9. Building Green Blog: Included on this blog is a list of essential priorities in green building.
10. Building My Green Life: The author doesn’t just advocate sustainable building, but also a sustainable life.
11. Sustainable Construction Blog: An architectural engineering student created the Sustainable Construction Blog, which discusses new technology and products in the construction industry that assist sustainability.
12. Sustainable Cities Blog: This blog discusses the actions that cities across the world are taking to become more sustainable.
13. Seattle Daily Journal of Commerce: Building Green Blog: Green building issues in the Pacific Northwest – a notably green area in the US – and beyond are discussed.
14. Environmental Building Strategies: Environmental news that affects contractors and residential professionals is featured on this blog.
15. GreenBuildingAdvisor.com’s Green Building Blog: In this blog, readers can learn how to make their home more sustainable inside and out after perusing through the posts on this site.
16. iGreenBuild.com Blog: An excellent source for sustainable building information, addressing everything from sustainable design to environmental issues.
17. Green Built Blog: This blog contains lots of information pertaining to green housing, including green design trends and green developments.
18. Green Strides: Tips on green dorm living, fencing and eco-friendly garden fountains are offered on this blog.
19. GreenBuilder Blog: Experts from the green building movement offer their two cents of news in the industry and various other issues.
20. 100k House Blog: A blog that began as a journal of quest to build a $100,000 LEED Platinum home has evolved into a full-fledged source for green building info.
21. The Deans of Green: The Deans of Green live up to their name by offering details about green building and living.
22. Sustainable Building Codes: The author is a building code regulator who advocates the revision of modern building codes in order to encourage more sustainable construction.
23. Green Building Law Update: Issues in the green building industry that hinder progress are brought to light by a construction consultant.
24. Green Building Law Blog: Although the blog is run by an attorney based in Baltimore, insight is given into green building law and issues that affect the country.
25. Green Building Law: Green Building Law is based in the Pacific Northwest, but it covers a variety of green building legal issues important to people nationwide – not unlike Green Building Law Blog.


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Tuesday, November 23, 2010

The Extraordinary Growth of Green Building

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is celebrating its first billion square feet of LEED certified green buildings. Another six billion square feet of projects around the world are part of the LEED program.

LEED is a widely recognized program that requires reductions in energy and water, it also makes use of recyclable and non-toxic materials. LEED certified buildings save money, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and contribute to a healthier environment.

LEED stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. The LEED program was created by the USGBC in 2000. Since its introduction, more than 36,000 commercial projects and 38,000 single family homes have participated in LEED.

Green building continued to grow even through a deep economic recession. The US green building market has expanded dramatically since 2008 and according to a new report titled, Green Outlook 2011, by McGraw-Hill Construction, it is projected to double in size by 2015.
Green construction starts increased from $42 billion in 2008 to $71 billion in 2010, and it is expected to grow to $135 billion by 2015.

In the commercial sector, one-third of all new projects are now built to green standards and it is projected to triple in the next five years.

A survey of building owners indicated that green projects reduce operating costs (13.6% on average for new buildings and 8.5% for retrofits), increase building values (10.9% for new buildings and 6.8% for retrofits) and increase their return on investment (9.9% for new buildings and 19.2% for retrofits.)

The report indicates that the extraordinary growth of green buildings is attributable to the owners' desire for market differentiation and growing public awareness. This growth is also due to an increase in government regulation and legislation. As of September 2010, 12 federal agencies and 33 states had green building legislation and initiatives. Local government initiatives increased from 156 localities in 2008 to 384 localities in 2010.

Harvey M. Bernstein, a vice president of McGraw-Hill Construction, said in a statement. "In today's economy, firms that specialize in green or serve this market are seeing a tremendous advantage."


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Monday, November 22, 2010

World's Largest Green Building Conference & Expo

From November 17 – 19, building professionals from all over the world came together in Chicago for Greenbuild, the world's largest and most comprehensive green building conference and expo. Greenbuild is organized by Washington-based U.S. Green Building Council. With more than 27,000 attendees from 112 countries, the annual event is the premier networking event in the world of green building.

The week-long event featured 1,800 booths where more than 1,000 companies displayed their green goods and services.

Greenbuild 2010 also featured nearly 200 education sessions. The extensive educational programming and workshops covered commercial and residential building design, construction, operation, maintenance, and financing, as well as related topics like neighborhood development. Many of the educational sessions offer professional credential CEU's.

Additional residential training and certification workshops were held November 15th and 16th, preceding Greenbuild.

Former secretary of State and retired general Colin Powell gave the keynote opening speech on November 17, and Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan gave the closing address on November 19.

Greenbuild, was first held in Austin, Texas, in 2002, and next year (2011), for first time, the event will be held outside of the United States, in Toronto, Canada.

This conference not only promoted green building, it is also a more environmentally responsible event that included recycling, composting and fair-trade products.

For more information go to http://www.greenbuildexpo.org/.


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Sunday, November 21, 2010

How to Land a Green Job

Green jobs encompass a wide range of occupations. Green jobs can play a pivotal role in reducing unemployment and reviving a sluggish economy. The green market has enormous potential, more than any other industry. We have already seen massive growth in the solar and wind industries and this is sure to continue.

Far too many American politicians confuse the debate by denying climate change rather than advance green jobs. However, the burgeoning awareness will make it increasingly difficult for these politicians to continue their resistance to the inevitable transition to clean energy. Clean energy is a matter of national security, it is also a matter of international competitiveness.

Green collar jobs are already playing a vital role spurring economic growth and providing green jobs. In Europe, countries like Spain are investing heavily in renewable energy with the expectation that this will reduce unemployment and help grow their national economy.

Increasing numbers of green job seekers are looking to enter the green market. Green job seekers should learn about the companies and technologies that are part of the green revolution. An appropriate Education and ongoing learning is key. Green job seekers need to continually update their skills to keep up with the latest trends, they also need to attend conferences, and network with others in their chosen green field.

An outstanding resume that is focused on cleantech or other sustainable skills can go a long way to help people secure a green job. Leverage your experiences and position yourself for a green career. It is important to note that each industry has its own specific needs, and rather than a generic resume your resume should highlight your cleantech experience and other relevant experience. A cover letter tailored to the company to which you are applying is also an important part of a successful job application.

Volunteering can also give you valuable experience. For helpful green volunteer information visit "Sustainability Pro Bono Exhange," (SPBEX). SPBEX is a kind of match-making service between green/sustainability professionals and organizations in search of such professionals on a volunteer basis.

An online community for the unemployed known as lemonadeit, provides information for the unemployed. This site has a wealth of tools for the unemployed seeking to become employed.


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Friday, November 19, 2010

Canadian Tire's Sustainability Leadership

Canadian Tire Corporation is showing sustainability leadership by reducing energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and waste. According to a recent news release, it is among the first major Canadian companies to report quarterly on its efforts, reflecting the integration of sustainability into its daily operations and aligning environmental and profit performances.

Canadian Tire was founded in 1922 and officially incorporated in 1927. Canadian Tire has a long-standing tradition of operating with integrity. Canadian Tire's commitment to ethical business practices is a key part of their core values of honesty and respect.

The company has developed a Code of Business Conduct to appropriately direct the actions of all employees and those individuals who act on behalf of the company. In addition, the company also has a separate Supplier Code of Business Conduct.

Canadian Tire also applies these high standards to its sustainability initiatives. The company has completed a total of 200 sustainability projects in 2010.

Canadian Tire's sustainability measures are reported in relation to three key segments of the business operations: Products and packaging; product transportation and buildings and operations.

One of the highlights this year include the design, construction, and opening of the first of its next-generation, energy efficient stores. These stores are 75 per cent more energy efficient than those built in 2010.

Packaging and handling changes to its retail products are helping Canadian Tire avoid 620 tonnes of product and packaging waste annually. Right-sizing 35 products is reducing 470 tonnes of packaging material. (Product rightsizing ensures that products are not over-packaged for the size and fragility of the product in question, contributing to reduced transportation costs, GHG emissions and packaging stewardship fees).

Tyler Elm, VP of Business Sustainability at Canadian Tire is committed to the company's sustainability goals, and strongly supports the integration of sustainability into business operations at a high level.

Through collaboration and soliciting feedback, Canadian Tire is demonstrating its commitment to stakeholders.

Canadian Tire is a leader in sustainability best practices and a model for others to follow. The company is not only appreciated by patrons across the country, its leadership has been recognized by Canadian Business for Social Responsibility (CBSR).


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Thursday, November 18, 2010

Green Market Opportunity Being Missed by Canada

Canadian business is failing to take advantage of the exploding global market for green technology, according to a study by the Conference Board of Canada. The report indicated that Canadian business could do much more to leverage its strengths in cleantech.

The report titled, Global Climate-Friendly Trade: Canada's Chance to Clean Up, said world trade in cleantech grew by an average of 10 percent annually from 2002 to 2008. But it said Canada's exports in that area didn't grow at all during that period.

"The trade data suggest that Canada is not deeply engaged in the global market for climate-friendly technologies," the report says. "To the degree that it is involved, it is more of a technology adopter than a technology maker."

The report estimates that total global imports of technologies that help to cut greenhouse gas emissions were $209 billion in 2008. Canada's share of that was $4 billion.

"Governments should eliminate domestic and international barriers to developing, trading, and investing in climate-friendly technologies," the report urges.

“Canada will not be a leader in everything, but it is not too late for this country to be a leader in some technologies, parts of technologies, or related services," said the report's author, Danielle Goldfarb, who is also associate director of the Conference Board's International Trade and Investment Centre.

According to Goldfarb, Canada's relative strengths are largely attributable to its geography and its resource base. If properly harnessed, Canada could become a world leaders in specific climate-friendly technologies and services like gas turbines, membranes for landfills, waste containers and photovoltaic system controllers.

The report makes it clear that Canadian businesses have the potential to be leaders in some of these technologies if they adopt more globally oriented business practices and get more policy support from government.

With Canada producing only one 10th of Germany's cleantech output, the country has a long way to go to catch up to the Europeans. An important part of the issue is about the direction of national policy. While Canada is doing very little, the European Union is committed to cutting emissions by up to 30 per cent on 1990 levels.


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