Friday, May 25, 2012

Corporate Sustainability Experts Scoff at International Agreements

Corporate sustainability experts have little faith in international agreements to combat climate change. When asked to rank the most effective strategies to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, these experts put international agreements like Rio +20 dead last.

These results come from a survey by SustainAbility and GlobeScan  which asked more than 800 sustainability experts and practitioners located in more than 70 countries about their views on climate change policy. They asked respondents to rank the effectiveness of various approaches to address climate change. These approaches include, economic instruments, regulatory approaches and technology development.

Despite repeated attempts the world has not yet succeeded in agreeing to an international treaty that is capable of reigning in carbon emissions. Even the imminent expiration of Kyoto has not produced an international agreement to manage climate change.

The results of this study indicate that corporate sustainability experts have little confidence that international agreements can produce results. This is reflected in the low expectations for the Rio +20 Conference on Sustainable Development in June, and the UN's annual Conference of the Parties (COP).

© 2012, Richard Matthews. All rights reserved.

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2 comments:

Harry said...

Since International Agreements do not work, what should be done on a national basis?


Go Green, Go Solar

Richard Matthews said...

I think it is difficult if not impossible to reduce GHGs on the scale required without international agreements. However, at present there is neither political will nor adequate popular support. The first step to securing political support for those agreements is to vote for candidates who indicate they are prepared to accept globally binding treaties on the environment.