Thursday, September 3, 2015

An LSE Cost Benefit Analysis Supports Climate Action

Research from the London School of Economics (LSE) makes the economic case for acting on climate change. This study along with many other make the point that the costs of inaction on global warming are far greater than the costs of acting. This is in addition to the costs of the damage caused by climate change

Much has been said about the costs of combating global warming but a slew of independent research indicates that the benefits of climate action far outweigh the costs. This was the conclusion of Citibank study published in August.

Two research institutes at the London School of Economics found that there are significant economic gains from limiting emissions. The LSE study published in July says that improved air quality, energy efficiency and energy security combine with falling renewable energy prices to make climate action the more economically compelling option.

The employment and health benefits alone outweigh the costs of climate mitigation even if we do not factor the liabilities associated with the damaging impacts of climate change.

In the simplest terms climate action has massive economic benefits while inaction will augur massive costs.

Related
Acting on Climate Change Makes Good Economic Sense According to Citibank
Action on Climate Change a Cost Benefit Analysis
The Cost of Delaying Action to Stem Climate Change
Climate Change: Frequency, Costs and Mortality (World Meteorological Organization)
Graphics - Cost of Delaying Action to Stem Climate Change
Businesses Feel the Heat from Declining Labor Productivity
Economic Benefits of Combating Climate Change (IIED)
Economic Costs of Combating Climate Change (IPCC)
Reducing Fossil Fuel Use: The Longer We Wait the More it will Cost
Infographic - How Much Would it Cost to Go Green Globally?
Graphic - The Cost of Mitigating Climate Change
The Financial Costs of Biodiversity Loss
Extreme Weather and the Costs of Climate Change
The Costs of Global Warming
The Costs of Climate Change Related Flooding

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